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Hip Arthritis

Hip Arthritis Doctor in Austin and San Antonio

Hip Anatomy, Pathology, and Treatments:

The hip is composed of two bones, the head of the femur (ball on top of thigh bone) and the acetabulum (socket) that is a portion of the pelvis. The ends of these bones that move about each other have a layer of cartilage, which forms the surface of the joint. In arthritis the cartilage layer is progressively destroyed by mechanical factors and inflammation. Patients may experience improvement with a hip steroid injection. Some treatment is aimed at preserving remaining cartilage by unloading this through osteotomy (surgery to realign bone). There are also surgeries, which attempt to remove excess bone that causes impingement and cartilage damage with arthroscopy. Severe cases may be indicated for a minimally invasive anterior approach total hip replacement surgery or total hip arthroplasty.

The Labrum
The edge of the acetabulum is lined by a fibro cartilaginous lip of tissue called the labrum. The labrum normally acts to regulate joint fluid into and out of the hip, acts to improve stability of the hip and in some cases will deepen the socket. Hip impingement and hip dysplasia can cause tears of the labrum. The labrum will routinely undergo degenerative changes in the setting of hip arthritis and can develop a tear. A minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery may be indicated in select cases.

The Synovium
The edge of the acetabulum is lined by a fibro cartilaginous lip of tissue called the labrum. The labrum normally acts to regulate joint fluid into and out of the hip, acts to improve stability of the hip and in some cases will deepen the socket. Hip impingement and hip dysplasia can cause tears of the labrum. The labrum will routinely undergo degenerative changes in the setting of hip arthritis and can develop a tear. A minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery may be indicated in select cases.

Hip Arthritis Symptoms

  • Dull achine throb deep in the hip
  •  Knee pain
  • Sharp stabbing pain
  • Hip weakness
  • Stiffness
  • Swelling
  • Reduced range of motion
  • Cannot fully bend or straighten the hip

Discomfort and pain are described by patients as a dull, aching throb that is deep in the hip. This typically is located in the groin fold in front of the hip and will radiate down the front of the thigh toward the inner aspect of the knee and toward the buttock region. In fact, many patients may have the sensation that their knee hurts; however, it may just be radiating pain from hip joint problems. Many will also describe a sharp, stabbing type of pain that is equilibrated to being “stabbed by an icepick”. Pain can also elicit a feeling of weakness in the muscles around the hip, which can result in the leg buckling or giving way. The pain typically increases whenever the hip joint is bent during activities like squatting, sitting and stairs. Athletic activities such as running and jumping, which require hip flexion, will also aggravate these symptoms. Activities that also require rotation through the hip, such as golf and pickleball may also increase these symptoms. 
Stiffness is a common finding in patients with hip arthritis. This is described as stiffness in the morning, when they first get out of bed or when they rise from a seated position where they have been stationary for a long time. I commonly hear “it takes me a minute or two to get my joints warmed up before I start walking”. 
Swelling can be recurrent in people with arthritis. This is likely due to inflammation of the synovium, or joint lining, that produces fluid. This is described as “having too much fluid inside the hip.” 
A person’s range of motion, or movement, of the hip will also be affected. This effectively decreases ones ability to fully bend or straighten the hip. Patients typically have difficulty tying shoes or picking up objects from low-lying places. 
In severe cases, a person may be able to feel or hear the hip joint moving and grinding. This may be a result of damaged cartilage and bone moving about each other or perhaps from loose fragments floating in the hip or a flap from a concomitant labrum tear catching on the overlying bone

What Kind of Fractures Do We Treat?

Our orthopedic specialists are trained to manage fractures of the entire musculoskeletal system.  This ranges from finger fractures all the way to hip and pelvis fractures.  See below for a few videos about types of fractures we treat.

 

Risk Factors for Hip Arthritis

  • Repetitive bending
  • high cholesterol
  • Previous injury to the hip
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Hip impingement

As with many other forms of arthritis, there may be a genetic predisposition that increases ones risk for developing arthritis in the hip. Repetitive bending such as is required in farming may increase a person’s risk for developing hip arthritis. Research also indicates an increased risk with metabolic abnormalities such as high cholesterol. Previous injury to the hip such as fractures that extend into the joint or a hard fall may increase the risk of cartilage damage. Anatomic abnormalities have been shown to increase a person’s risk for developing hip arthritis. Hip Dysplasia is best described as having a hip socket (acetabulum) that is too shallow. This causes a smaller portion of the cartilage to bear all of the pressure of the body which increases the chance for cartilage damage. Hip Impingement (femoral acetabular impingement) is a process that may involve too much bone on the femoral head (ball) or acetabulum (socket). This leads to the two bones abnormally contacting each other, which in turn causes damage to the labrum and cartilage.

Reviews

jasmine Franklin
19:47 16 Oct 20
Doctors and staff are very kind.
Gerry Cullen
17:19 06 Sep 20
Dr.Jimenez is a great physician. My knee pain became very painful and friends thought I’d need a replacement. No. Dr.Jimenez injected into my kneecap and the pain stopped. He also repaired my ankle. Thanks, Gerry C.read more
Suzi Fields
19:53 09 Aug 20
patsy devries
15:39 08 Aug 20
Dr Jimenez and his staff are amazing. Dr. Jimenez replaced both of my hip joints the left in December and the right in June. I had a lot of arthritis and no cartilage and a bone spur. Since my surgeries I can say I am pain free and it actually feels like I was born with my new hips. The anterior approach is a very fast recovery Thanks again Dr Jimenezread more
Belinda Barron
22:40 06 Aug 20

What we Treat

Knee Treatments
Knee Arthritis
Knee Tendon Injuries
Knee Ligament Injuries
Meniscus Tears

Hip Treatments
Hip Arthritis
Hip Labrum Tears
Hip Impingement
Hip Dysplasia
Avascular Necrosis
Fractures