Contact Us Today

How We Treat

Knee Treatments

Knee Injections

Knee injections can be used to treat a variety of ailments, ranging from meniscus tears to arthritis and inflammation. Corticosteroid injections, or steroid injections, are often used in the treatment of knee arthritis. The goal of this injection is to offer pain relief and decrease inflammation in the knee.

Onset: Immediate relief within minutes to hours. This is due to the anesthetic medication that usually accompanies the steroid.
Duration: Some patients will experience pain relief for several months; however, others may only experience a few weeks or days of relief.
Limitations: Most physicians would not recommend more that 3-4 steroid injections into a joint in any year. There is actually scientific evidence supporting the notion that corticosteroid may actually be harmful to the long-term health of the cartilage.


A layer of synovial tissue, which produces joint fluid, surrounds the knee joint. This fluid has a high concentration of hyaluronic acid, which is known to help with joint mechanics and cartilage health. The arthritic knee will be deficient in this substance and studies have indicated that by providing more fluid to the knee with injections of this substance, patients may experience improvements in pain and overall joint function. This material is usually injected in a series of three injections that are usually separated by several days. Some companies will extract this material from rooster combs, hence the term rooster comb injections or chicken shots. Other popular terms for these injections include gel shots, visco shots or viscosupplementation.

Onset: Results are variable. Some patients have experienced some degree of improvement in symptoms with in days after their injections; however, others may not experience the maximum effect of the injections for several weeks after completion of the injection series.
Duration: Some patients may experience pain relief for several weeks if not months after an injection series. Many insurance companies, including Medicare, require patients to wait 6 months before repeating the injection series.

Knee Arthroscopy

Arthroscopic knee surgery entails visualizing the joint and structures inside the joint on a magnified screen through a camera that is inserted into the knee. This is a minimally invasive procedure that can be accomplished through a couple of small incisions in front of the knee. The camera is inserted through one of the incisions and arthroscopic tools are inserted through the other. This can be used to diagnosis disorders in the knee such as synovial inflammation, ligament tears, and cartilage damage and meniscus tears. Treatment such as meniscus repair or debridement can also be performed during the procedure.

Recovery: This is usually done as an outpatient procedure, meaning that you go home the same day.
Recovery: Weight bearing status will depend on the treatments performed at the time of your surgery. Patients will usually have visits with a physical therapist after the surgery to help ensure appropriate recovery.

Knee Subchondral Bone Treatment

There is emerging evidence that supports the notion that much of the knee pain associated with arthritis could be a result of the bone abnormalities in the subchondral bone, which is the bone found underneath the cartilage. Treatments directed at this can usually be performed during a knee arthroscopy. This usually entails accessing the area of bone injury with a small drill and attempting to treat the area with an injected material.

Knee Replacement


A total knee arthroplasty, or knee replacement surgery may be your best option for long-term relief of symptoms from osteoarthritis. Other conditions that may warrant a knee replacement include avascular necrosis of the knee and post-traumatic arthritis of the knee. A total knee arthroplasty, replacement, entails removing the diseased and worn portions of a joint including the cartilage and replacing the surfaces of the bones with metal. A plastic liner is inserted in between the artificial surfaces of the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone). At Joint Pain Orthopedics, knee replacement surgeries are performed in a minimally invasive manner that limits damage to tissue around the knee. The surgery can be performed under a spinal anesthetic in most patients. After surgery, we have an extensive protocol that has been developed to allow for rapid recovery and improved pain control. Benefits of having a procedure such as a total knee replacement done by a surgeon who performs a high volume of joint replacement surgeries, such as a joint replacement specialist, may include a lower complication rate. Dr. Christopher Jimenez has undergone extensive orthopedic.

How long does it take to recover from a knee replacement?
This depends on your definition of recovery. To some patients, this means, “When will I be able to walk?” Patients should expect to be up and walking with a physical therapist within a couple of hours after the surgery. In general, patients should expect to be up and walking the day of surgery. Rehabilitation after a knee replacement can vary depending on each patient’s goals and expectations. Physical therapy duration can be expected to several weeks to a couple of months after a surgery.

How long will I be in the hospital?
This varies depending on each patient’s health status and fitness level. Select patients may be candidates for surgery in an outpatient setting, meaning they may not even have to stay in the hospital after surgery. Others can remain in the hospital for anywhere from 1-2 days to allow for adequate management of pain and mobility training with the therapist.

What we Treat

Knee Treatments
Knee Arthritis
Knee Tendon Injuries
Knee Ligament Injuries
Meniscus Tears

Hip Treatments
Hip Arthritis
Hip Labrum Tears
Hip Impingement
Hip Dysplasia
Avascular Necrosis
Fractures

Reviews

Gerry Cullen
17:19 06 Sep 20
Dr.Jimenez is a great physician. My knee pain became very painful and friends thought I’d need a replacement. No. Dr.Jimenez injected into my kneecap and the pain stopped. He also repaired my ankle. Thanks, Gerry C.read more
Suzi Fields
19:53 09 Aug 20
patsy devries
15:39 08 Aug 20
Dr Jimenez and his staff are amazing. Dr. Jimenez replaced both of my hip joints the left in December and the right in June. I had a lot of arthritis and no cartilage and a bone spur. Since my surgeries I can say I am pain free and it actually feels like I was born with my new hips. The anterior approach is a very fast recovery Thanks again Dr Jimenezread more
Belinda Barron
22:40 06 Aug 20
Melissa Neff
13:06 03 Aug 20
Today is my two year kneeversary, and I couldn’t be happier. I struggled for YEARS, and couldn’t keep up with my four kids, let alone get around comfortably at home. Dr Jimenez literally gave me my life back, and I’m so appreciative! I suffered all day, every day, and now I don’t even think about my knee once. So freeing! Thank you so much for helping me Dr J! You’re the best!!!read more

Hip Treatments

Hip Injections

Hip injections can be used to treat a variety of ailments, ranging from labrum tears to arthritis and inflammation. Corticosteroid injections, or steroid injections, are often used in the treatment of hip arthritis. The goal of this injection is to offer pain relief and decrease inflammation in the hip.

Onset: Immediate relief within minutes to hours. This is due to the anesthetic medication that usually accompanies the steroid.

Duration: Some patients will experience pain relief for several months; however, others may only experience a few weeks or days of relief.

Limitations: Most physicians would not recommend more that 3-4 steroid injections into a joint in any year. There is actually scientific evidence supporting the notion that corticosteroid may actually be harmful to the long-term health of the cartilage.

Hip Arthroscopys

Arthroscopic hip surgery entails visualizing the joint and structures inside the joint on a magnified screen through a camera that is inserted into the hip. This is a minimally invasive procedure that can be accomplished through a couple of small incisions around the hip. The camera is inserted through one of the incisions and arthroscopic tools are inserted through the other. This can be used to diagnosis disorders in the hip such as synovial inflammation, labrum tears, and cartilage damage. Treatment such as labral repair or debridement can also be performed during the procedure.

Duration: This is usually done as an outpatient procedure, meaning that you go home the same day.

Recovery: Weight bearing status will depend on the treatments performed at the time of your surgery. Patients will usually have visits with a physical therapist after the surgery to help ensure appropriate recovery.

Hip Decompression

A hip core decompression surgery can be performed for patients with early stages of avascular necrosis. This is a disease process that involves a disruption of the blood supply to the femoral head or “ball” of the hip joint. Pain in the hip joint resulting from avascular necrosis may be improved by relieving pressure to the affected area. A core decompression procedure entails accessing the necrotic, or dead bone, through drill holes in the femur, which allow for decompression of the elevated pressures in bone associated with avascular necrosis.

Anterior Approach Hip Replacement:

A total hip arthroplasty, or hip replacement surgery may be your best option for long-term relief of symptoms from arthritis. Other conditions that may warrant a hip replacement include avascular necrosis of the hip, hip dysplasia and post-traumatic arthritis of the hip. At Joint Pain Orthopedics, the procedure is usually done through a minimally invasive, direct anterior approach to the hip. This allows the surgeon to avoid cutting into muscle and allows for a more rapid recovery when compared to conventional hip replacement surgeries done using different surgical approaches. The surgery can be performed under a spinal anesthetic in most patients. After surgery, we have an extensive protocol that has been developed to allow for rapid recovery and improved pain control. Benefits of having a procedure such as a total hip replacement done by a surgeon who performs a high volume of joint replacement surgeries, such as a joint replacement specialist, may include a lower complication rate. Dr. Christopher Jimenez has undergone extensive orthopedic training at the University of Utah under the direction of leaders in the field of joint replacement surgeries, including Dr. Chris Peters. In addition to this, he undertook a 1-year joint replacement fellowship in California where he performed surgeries with and learned from Dr. Joel Matta, who is a well-known surgeon throughout the world and is widely regarded as a pioneer in the direct anterior approach hip replacement. Dr. Edward McPherson was also instrumental to the development and education of Dr. Jimenez as he is widely regarded as an expert when it comes to revision joint replacement surgeries. This has given Dr. Jimenez the education, experience and ability to manage even the most complex joint replacements and revision surgeries.

How long does it take to recover from a hip replacement?
This depends on your definition of recovery. To some patients, this means, “When will I be able to walk?” Patients should expect to be up and walking with a physical therapist within a couple of hours after the surgery. In general, patients should expect to be up and walking the day of surgery. Rehabilitation after a hip replacement can vary depending on each patient’s goals and expectations. Physical therapy duration can be expected to several weeks to a couple of months after a surgery.

How long will I be in the hospital?
This varies depending on each patient’s health status and fitness level. Select patients may be candidates for surgery in an outpatient setting, meaning they may not even have to stay in the hospital after surgery. Others can remain in the hospital for anywhere from 1-2 days to allow for adequate management of pain and mobility training with the therapist.

Anti-Inflammatory Medication

Anti-inflammatory pain medication includes over the counter agents such as ibuprofen and naproxen. There are also prescription strength anti-inflammatories, or NSAIDs, that can be prescribed. These agents act to decrease both pain and inflammation that may be associated with arthritis. Ask your orthopedic provider or primary care provider if this may be an option for treatment of your symptoms.